The Lion King Official Teaser Trailer



6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age.

6. Don't assume that all wines improve with age.

1. Don't forget to pay attention to the color of your vino.

Not all rosé is a vibrant pink.

Ever since rosé's resurgence in the early aughts, many consumers believe that a "quality" version of this wine needs to display a certain pale, Millennial-pink hue and that any darker-colored rosé can be automatically dismissed as subpar. In truth, however, well-made rosé comes in a spectrum of shades. Darker rosés do carry different flavor profiles than their paler counterparts, so a bit of education will go a long way here.

Seattle-based sommelier Myles Burroughs of Smith, Linda's Tavern, Oddfellows, and King's Hardware, offers a quick crash course in what you can learn from a rosé's specific hue:

"There are two prominent methods for making rosé wine. The first is through maceration (allowing grapes to sit on their skins after pressing to develop color, aroma and tannic structure from the outside of the grapes). The other is called the Saignée method, wherein red wine is bled off to concentrate the flavor of red wine and the remaining juice is fermented to create rosé. Typically, the maceration method tends to lend itself to the bright, fresh, zippy character that I prefer when looking to select a pink wine, and rosés made with this method are more intentional by design, meaning you have a better chance of landing a good one. Thankfully, you can be relatively sure a wine was made using the maceration method just by looking at it, as they tend to be much lighter in color (and often in alcohol content)."

While Burroughs, like many blush-wine drinkers, prefers pale blush rosés, wine director Zwann Grays of Olmsted in Brooklyn points out that excellent rosés can indeed come in darker shades of pink.

"There is a misconception that rosés that are not the palest of pink, are sweet. The fact is that many rosés with a deeper color are actually dry and will impart more flavor and a bit more fruit, which, in my opinion, is what I want from a high-quality wine," Grays explained. So if you want a rosé that drinks more like a light, food-friendly red than like a white, these deeper-hued rosés will fit the bill.






Video: #AskGaryVee Episode 49: High-End Wine, Bucket Lists, & Self-Confidence

6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age
6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age images

2019 year
2019 year - 6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age pictures

6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age forecast
6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age recommend photo

6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age pics
6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age pics

6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age 6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age new images
6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age new images

images 6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age
pics 6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age

Watch 6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age video
Watch 6. Dont assume that all wines improve with age video

Discussion on this topic: 6. Dont assume that all wines improve , 6-dont-assume-that-all-wines-improve/
Discussion on this topic: 6. Dont assume that all wines improve , 6-dont-assume-that-all-wines-improve/ , 6-dont-assume-that-all-wines-improve/

Related News


Hanky Panky Lingerie Tips: How To Care For YourUnderthings
How to Take Vitamin D3
How to Uninstall McAfee Total Protection
High-Intensity Interval Training for Beginners
Lanvin Winter 2014 Collection
Taylor Swift Ditches Her Classic Style, Plus More Celeb Beauty
How to Be Happy Always
How to Enjoy Writing a Diary
What Khloé Kardashian Eats to Boost HerMetabolism
How to Get Glowing Skin For Your Next Big DateNight
7 Essential Tips For Wiping Out Your Worst Menopause Symptoms
How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Complications
David J. Bookbinder, LMHC
The One Product Thatll Save Your Sensitive Skin This Winter



Date: 16.12.2018, 19:53 / Views: 65275